Filed Under:  Uncategorized

Fast & Furious: The gift that keeps on giving

December 20th 2012   ·   0 Comments

More than two years after the murder of a Border Patrol agent cracked the lid on a gun trafficking scandal that would bring down careers, hound the attorney general and force Capitol Hill hearings, the mismanaged Operation Fast and Furious continues to provide one thing that may haunt the Obama administration for years: Dead bodies.

The latest victim may be Mexican beauty queen Maria Susana Flores Gamez, according to CBS News investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson, whose dogged reporting earned for her a well-deserved Emmy award earlier this year. Flores Gamez reportedly was used as a human shield last month, and near her body, a semiautomatic rifle linked to Operation Fast and Furious suspect Uriel Patino was recovered.

This column profiled Patino in the spring of 2011. He purchased hundreds of guns during the investigation.

It is apparently not unusual for Mexican gunmen to leave weapons at a crime scene after the shooting stops.

… the weapon recently recovered,” Grassley wrote, “was purchased by Patino at an Arizona FFL on March 16, 2010, a day on which Patino purchased a total of 10 weapons. On November 23, 2012, over two years since its purchase, Patino’s weapon was recovered by Mexican authorities in Ciudad Guamuchil, Sinaloa, Mexico.

“At this time, it is unclear to which event this Patino weapon is connected. However, on the same weekend the weapon was recovered, ABC News reported on a gunfight in the area of Ciudad Guamuchil between Sinaloa drug cartel members and the Mexican military in which five lives were claimed including one Mexican military member as well as Sinaloa beauty queen, Maria Susana Flores Gamez. According to ABC News, near Gamez’s body, authorities found an AK-47 assault rifle and 60 shell casings.”.

Grassley has asked Holder to respond to four questions by Jan. 7:.

When did the Department of Justice notify the Mexican Government about the, 1).
connection of this weapon to Operation Fast and Furious? Who at the.
Department provided this information to the Mexican Government?
2) Was the Department planning on notifying Congress that a Fast and Furious.
weapon had been recovered?
3) Is the Department aware of any recoveries of the other nine weapons that Patino.
purchased on March 16, 2010?
4) Has the ATF or the Department requested that ATF’s National Tracing.
treat information about traces that connect back to Fast and Furious weapons.
any differently than a routine trace request? Please explain the differences if so.

Another man involved in the Fast and Furious operation was sentenced last week to 57 months in prison. Jaime Avila, Jr., 25, was the man who bought the two rifles recovered at the murder scene of Border Patrol agent Brian Terry, who was killed Dec. 14, 2010, just over two years ago. It was that incident that ignited the investigation by National Gun Rights Examiner David Codrea and independent blogger Mike Vanderboegh, both of whom broke the story of Fast and Furious.

Some 2,000 to 2,500 guns were allowed to walk by officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives in Phoenix, Ariz. Leading officials involved in that operation have either resigned or were recently recommended for dismissal by a professional review panel in the agency.

But as now appears certain, the guns allowed to get into the hands of Mexican cartel gunmen will continue to turn up at crime scenes, and be used to wreak havoc, for some time to come.

A version of this column originally appeared in www.examiner.com.
stat counter
This article originally posted on U.S. Open Borders.

Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

By

Readers Comments (0)


You must be logged in to post a comment.